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advance to the COP27, a report asking for climate justice

advance to the COP27, a report asking for climate justice

advance to the COP27, a report asking for climate justice

advance to the COP27, a report asking for climate justice

According to a report on climate change released by KASB Securities on a climate change seminar Thursday ahead of the upcoming COP27, “the developing countries should not face undue pressure from developed nations to take drastic steps in reducing GHG emissions” given the disproportionately high cumulative greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from developed countries in history.

The terrible floods in Pakistan, which as of yesterday had resulted in 1,739 fatalities, 12,867 injuries, and 33 million displaced people, provide a stark illustration of the significant humanitarian costs the Global South is bearing as a result of the North’s excessive carbon emissions.

advance to the COP27, a report asking for climate justice

 

“A terrible calculation of climatic injustice has made the people of Pakistan its victims. Despite contributing less than 1% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, Pakistan is paying a disproportionately high price for man-made climate change, according to UN Secretary-general Guterres in a speech to the General Assembly.

Historically speaking, wealthy nations have greatly surpassed developing ones in terms of total GHG emissions. According to the IEA, the G7 was responsible for 34.5% of all global greenhouse gas emissions in the energy sector between 1971 and 2020. The US is the top emitter of GHGs globally, accounting for 20% of the total and emitting roughly 56 times more than Pakistan.

advance to the COP27, a report asking for climate justice

 

 

Encouragements to combat climate change

The predicted cost of climate adaptation was determined to be 5–10 times higher than the current public adaptation financial flows, according to the UN Adaption Gap Report. The world anticipates that the US and EU will fulfil their pledge of $100 billion in climate funding to developing nations and lead the charge in reducing emissions to protect other nations’ right to development.

Additionally, there should be a fair and sensible lowering in emission regulations. The 2030 carbon emission target set by US President Biden calls for a 50–22% drop from 2005 levels. However, according to the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR), even a 50% reduction implies that the US would have nearly zero per capita emissions in 2030.

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