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In his biography, Wasim Akram discusses his cocaine addiction

In his biography, Wasim Akram discusses his cocaine addiction

In his biography, Wasim Akram discusses his cocaine addiction

In his biography, Wasim Akram discusses his cocaine addiction

In his biography, Wasim Akram discusses his cocaine addiction

Wasim Akram, a former Pakistani bowler, has said that, when his cricket career came to an end, he developed a cocaine addiction.

The revelation was made by the Sultan of Swing in his soon-to-be-published autobiography “Sultan: A Memoir,” extracts from which appeared in The Times, an English newspaper, along with his interview.

In his biography, Wasim Akram discusses his cocaine addiction

In both Test and ODI cricket, Akram leads Pakistan in wickets taken. In 2003, he retired from cricket after an 18-year international career.

The left-armer acknowledged that after retiring, he turned to cocaine as a “substitute for the adrenaline rush of competition.” After the passing of his first wife, Huma, in 2009, he continued by saying that he eliminated the threat.

An passage from his book states, “I wanted to pamper myself; I liked to party.” “South Asia’s famous culture is all-consuming, alluring, and corrupting. A night can have ten parties, and some people do. And I felt the effects of it. My technology became a vice.

“The worst part is that I became dependent on cocaine. My use gradually became more serious to the point that I felt I had to use it in order to function after I was offered a line at a party in England. It all seemed innocent enough at the time.

It gave me irritability. It induced deception in me. I am aware that Huma felt lonely a lot at this time. She would express a wish to relocate to Karachi in order to be closer to her family. I was opposed. Why? In part because I like travelling alone to Karachi and feigning business while actually partying for days on end.

“Huma soon discovered that I was lying after finding a package of cocaine in my wallet… You require aid. I concurred. It was out of control. I was unable to stop it. One line would multiply by two, which would then multiply by four, which would multiply by one, which would multiply by two. I had trouble falling asleep. I was unable to eat. I lost track of my diabetes, which led to migraines and mood changes in me. Like many addicts, a part of me welcomed the revelation since the secrecy had been draining.

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