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Pakistan has launched an investigation into the assassination of a journalist in Kenya

Pakistan has launched an investigation into the assassination of a journalist in Kenya

Pakistan has launched an investigation into the assassination of a journalist in Kenya

Pakistan has launched an investigation into the assassination of a journalist in Kenya

Islamabad: Pakistan will launch a formal investigation into the assassination in Kenya of a senior TV news presenter who fled the country to avoid sedition charges, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif announced on Tuesday.

Arshad Sharif, a vocal opponent of Pakistan’s powerful military establishment and a supporter of former Prime Minister Imran Khan, was killed last weekend when Kenyan police opened fire on his car at a checkpoint near Nairobi.

According to Kenyan officials, the cops thought they were shooting on a stolen car engaged in an abduction.

“I have decided to create a Judicial Commission to conduct an investigation into the death of journalist Arshad Sharif in order to ascertain the facts of the terrible occurrence in a transparent and conclusive way,” Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif tweeted on Tuesday.

Pakistan’s mainstream and social media were filled with conjecture that Sharif, who had openly said that he had received death threats, had been purposefully targeted.

“It was a premeditated assassination,” Shireen Mazari, a Khan supporter and cabinet minister in his former administration, tweeted, labelling the official account of events a “fiction.”

“We know, you know, so don’t add to our sadness by adding to our fury.”

Sharif departed the nation in August, only days after speaking with top opposition member Shahbaz Gill, who claimed subordinate officers in Pakistan’s military should defy orders that contradicted “the desire of the public.”

The news channel was momentarily taken off the air as a result of Sharif’s remark, and an arrest order was filed for him.

Following the interview, Gill was imprisoned, and Khan’s criticism of the courts over the confinement led to his own appearance in court.

Pakistan has been dominated by the military for many decades of its 75-year existence, and criticising the security establishment has always been considered a red line.

It is ranked 157th of of 180 nations in Reporters Without Borders’ press freedom rating, with journalists enduring repression and harassment.

According to Pakistan’s Human Rights Commission, the establishment has “a long, terrible record of violent techniques to suppress journalists.”

Journalist Hamid Mir, who has survived at least two murder attempts, welcomed the investigation with caution.

“Please recall that in 2014, a judicial committee comprised of three Supreme Court judges was established to examine an assassination attempt on my life in Karachi,” he tweeted.

“I have six bullets.” I’ve been waiting for the commission report for eight years.”

The assassination has aroused indignation and suspicion in Kenya, where President William Ruto dissolved a police unit accused of arbitrary executions earlier this month and promised to revamp the country’s security forces.

Sharif’s body was scheduled to be repatriated to Pakistan on Wednesday, according to his wife.

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