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Sir Richard Branson refuses an invitation to a television discussion about the death sentence in Singapore.

Sir Richard Branson refuses an invitation to a television discussion about the death sentence in Singapore.

Sir Richard Branson refuses an invitation to a television discussion about the death sentence in Singapore.

Sir Richard Branson refuses an invitation to a television discussion about the death sentence in Singapore.

Sir Richard Branson has declined an offer from Singapore’s government to participate in a live televised discussion regarding the country’s narcotics policy and the death sentence.

He was asked to participate in a meeting with K Shanmugam, the city state’s home affairs minister.

The British businessman has stated his opposition to the death sentence in Singapore for offences such as drug smuggling.

He spoke out against the execution of drug lord Nagaendran Dharmalingam.

Sir Richard said in an open letter on his blog that televised discussions are “always at risk of valuing people over concepts And cannot do the complexities of the death sentence any service.”

He also urged the island nation’s administration to participate in “constructive, long-term debate with numerous stakeholders, as well as a sincere commitment to openness and evidence” in order to find a way to eliminate the death sentence.

How a Singapore execution sparked outrage ,Despite a mental infirmity appeal, Singapore kills a man.
Prior this month, Singapore’s Ministry of Home Affairs rebutted Sir Richard’s earlier blog post in which he said the government “looks focused on murdering dozens of low-level drug traffickers, largely members of impoverished, disadvantaged communities.”

He went on to explain that despite having “a well-documented intellectual handicap,” Malaysian Nagaenthran Dharmalingam was hung in Singapore earlier this year for narcotics trafficking.

Nagaenthran was apprehended coming into Singapore from Malaysia in 2009 with 43g (1.5oz) of heroin strapped to his left thigh.

Those found with more than 15g of heroin are susceptible to the death sentence under Singapore’s drug regulations, which are among the strictest in the world.

During his trial, the 34-year-old claimed he was compelled into transporting the narcotics, but subsequently admitted he did it because he needed money.

The court ruled that his original defence was “fabricated.” Eventually, he was sentenced to death by hanging.

Nagaenthran’s case was particularly contentious since a medical expert determined that he had an IQ of 69, which implies an intellectual handicap. However, a judge determined that he was not cognitively impaired.

The execution of Nagaenthran sparked a wave of protests as many spoke out against what they viewed as the unfairness of his death sentence.

Following Sir Richard’s criticism, Singapore’s government asked him to participate in a live televised discussion with Mr Shanmugam and offered to cover his travel and accommodation expenses.

According to the authorities, the death sentence is an obvious deterrent that has helped prevent big drug gangs from establishing themselves in the South East Asian country.

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